It’s Not Always Bad To Have the “Blues”!

Eastern bluebirds are Missouri's state bird. A female is reaching for a raisin at my feeder while the male waits for his turn.

Eastern bluebirds are Missouri’s state bird. They often visit my raisin feeders during the winter months. A female is reaching for a raisin while the male waits for his turn.

I’ve always been fascinated by bluebirds, ever since my grandpa pointed one out to me when I was a little girl. A lot of people get confused when I mention “bluebird”.

A blue jay. It is larger than the bluebird.

A blue jay. It is larger than the bluebird.

They usually say, “Oh, I don’t like them! They’re mean!”

“Not the bluebird,” I tell them. “You’re thinking about the blue JAY!”

Blue jays are larger birds. They are loud and have a reputation for being bullies at the feeders. They’re not all bad though, and often are the watch dogs when it comes to looking out for predators near the feeders. I must admit, despite their reputation, I actually enjoy those birds. But the bluebirds aren’t like that.

Bluebirds are small members of the thrush family. They’re actually related to the American robin. Their brilliant blue feathers and their gentle demeanor make them a garden favorite, not to mention the excellent insect control you get from hosting these little birds in your yard!

So why do so many people confuse the two?

It could be that they’re just not familiar with the bluebird. First of all, bluebirds don’t typically hang out at feeders. They are mainly insect eaters, although they will eat berries and may take raisins, peanuts or suet from feeders in the winter. Secondly, bluebird numbers were low for a while. That bluebird that I saw as a little girl was one of the last bluebirds that I saw for about twenty years until I saw one flying at a cemetery! With the introduction of aggressive house sparrows and starlings in the late 1800s to early 1900s which competed for nesting sites, loss of habitat due to urbanization, and compounded by some harsh winters in the late 70s and early 80s, bluebird populations were reduced by 90%. Thanks to the introduction of bluebird boxes (nest boxes specifically designed for bluebirds) and increased public awareness, bluebird numbers have slowly been recovering. I myself have been hosting bluebirds in my yard since I put up my first bluebird nest box in 2009.

As I’m writing this, I’m wondering if my resident bluebirds’ current clutch is getting ready to hatch. The male and female have been hanging around the entrance hole all day, often peering inside. This is their second clutch of the year, their first brood having left the nest a few weeks ago. They typically have 2 to 3 broods a year, laying between 4 to 6 eggs per clutch.

Left: A bluebird nest is cup-shaped. Right: Bluebirds lay 4 to 6 eggs per clutch.
A bluebird nest is cup shaped. Bluebirds lay 4 to 6 eggs per clutch.

The male introduces the female to the nest box around late February or early March, calling to her and waving his wings. Once she deems a site suitable, the female will proceed to build a cup shaped nest out of grass. She will build a new nest for each subsequent clutch throughout the season, stacking the nests right on top of the last. With the old nest box, I was able to pull each nest out individually at the end of the season. With my new nest box, however, I have to clean out the old nest right after the fledglings leave the nest, otherwise the new babies will be too close to the entrance hole and easier for predators to get to. Once the eggs are laid, incubation lasts for about two weeks.

Left: Baby bluebirds about 4 days old. Right: The male bluebird stands guard while two of his nestlings peek out of the nest box.
Baby bluebirds about 4 days old. The male bluebird standing guard while two of his nestlings peek out of the nest box.
A young bluebird sitting on a shepherd's hook near my house.

A young bluebird sitting on a shepherd’s hook near my house.

Don't take down those nest boxes! Bluebirds will often use them to roost in during the winter. About 9 bluebirds piled in this one to stay warm.

Don’t take down those nest boxes during the winter! About 9 bluebirds piled in this one to stay warm.

The female may be the one who builds the nest and sits on the eggs, but the male is still a doting father. He will often visit the eggs and “talk” to them, and then he will help feed the babies and keep the nest tidy once the babies have hatched. And after the young bluebirds have left the nest, which is around 15 to 18 days after they hatch, the male can often be seen looking after the youngsters while the female is sitting on the new clutch of eggs about a week later. The previous broods, too, will often help feed their younger siblings and by the end of the summer, I have a large family of bluebirds hanging around the yard!


For more information on how to attract bluebirds, nest box plans, and predator control, visit the North American Bluebird Society‘s website. Also, if you’d like to purchase a bluebird nest box, I highly recommend that you visit the Audubon Workshop. I’ve purchased several nest and roosting boxes from them and have been quite happy with my purchases!

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